Topic: Children's Services

BALI

Celebrating Meera Spillett: Gold Lifetime Achievement Award Winner at Social Worker of the Year

It’s a moment of pride and celebration at The Staff College as Meera Spillett, a trailblazer in social work and children’s services, has been awarded the prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award (Gold) at the Social Worker of the Year Awards. With an illustrious career spanning over 35 years, Meera has not only been at the forefront of initiatives that have shaped the landscape of social work but has also held various significant roles, including that of Director of Children’s Services. Her leadership and expertise have been instrumental in addressing the underrepresentation of black leaders in the social care sector. Meera’s written works, such as ‘Leading in Colour’, ‘Black Leaders Missing in Action’, and ‘Cultural Competence,’ have sparked essential conversations on race

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Just Home: Leading in Colour

We are proud to announce the release of our latest publication, “Just Home”. This briefing is powerfully centred around global majority children in care, their lives, their traumas, their needs, and their life-chances. The stark realities are alarming: black children are over-represented in the care system, wait longer for adoption than white children, and are least likely to achieve the lifetime stability and permanency of a loving family through adoption. “Just Home” serves to challenge these bleak statistics and seeks to inspire enduring policy and practice changes for children. Through our partnership with Adoption East Midlands and its partner local authorities, we have been able to challenge these sobering facts and seek solutions. “Just Home” is our shared story –

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Leading for Longer: New report issues call to action on high turnover of leadership roles in children’s services

A call for action has been issued by The Staff College after a number of concerns have been raised about the high turnover of leadership roles within children’s services.  With tenures of DCSs averaging around three years, it is feared this is having a direct impact on the ability to improve children’s services. At present, the DCS role remains one of the hardest chief officer roles to fill and retain, yet is a critical leadership role responsible for supporting and protecting vulnerable children across the United Kingdom.  Some of the key reasons cited for the high level of position churn include increased workloads, along with a lack of a coherent policy focus on children. In addition, an ‘overload’ of external

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Tribute to Patrick Scott

We are so sad about the death of Patrick Scott. Patrick had a huge influence over the offers we have now, particularly the Black and Asian Leadership Initiative and Aspiring and New Directors programmes.  As we and our partners remember and celebrate Patrick’s legacy, warmth and integrity, Anton Florek has written this tribute.   As a recently retired Director of Children’s Services, Patrick was invited by Steve Munby, the then Chief Executive of the National College of School Leadership to join our advisory team for the Directors of Children’s Services Leadership Provision, which was commissioned in November 2008 by the Department for Children, Schools and Families. Patrick brought a wealth of experience to the advisory team having served as a

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For long-term improvements, schools need to slow down

Pressure on schools to make rapid improvements discourages deeper thinking about long-term solutions. An article by: Jess Harris, Senior Lecturer in Education, University of Newcastle Mel Ainscow, Emeritus Professor of Education , University of Manchester Nerida Spina, Lecturer in Education, Queensland University of Technology Suzanne Carrington, Professor in Inclusive Education, Queensland University of Technology Published by The Conversation.

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UNESCO: A guide for ensuring inclusion and equity in schools

Including all learners and ensuring that each individual has an equal and personalised opportunity for educational progress is still a challenge in almost every country. Despite commendable progress made over the past two decades to expand access to basic education, further efforts are needed to minimise barriers to learning and to ensure that all learners in schools and other learning settings experience a genuine inclusive environment. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, with its focus on leaving no one behind, provides a unique opportunity to build more inclusive and equitable societies. This should start with inclusive education systems.

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Bits and Pieces No:5

The fifth in a suite of occasional reports. The views expressed in this publication, although personal, have been informed by the sessional discussions and thinking generated amongst the participants who attended the Staff College Summer Think Tank ‘Towards excellence and equity for all: educational innovation in changing times’ on 23rd – 24th August 2016. The Think Tank was attended by 23 senior leaders in children’s services, from local authorities across England.

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TOWARDS A CULTURE OF LIFELONG LEARNING

A place for learning, the third paper in the RSA’s Power to Create series is not framed in the conventional manner of a report on a key issue, in this case lifelong learning. Instead, Tony Breslin’s text is built around a memorandum from an outgoing and highly regarded director of education to a newly elected city mayor outlining a set of policy proposals. 

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Real Singaporean Lessons: Why do Singaporean Students perform so well in PISA?

In this latest post in the Leading Futures Series, edited by Alma Harris and Michelle Jones, Zongyi Deng and S. Gopinathan shine a spotlight on the success of Singapore’s school system and argue that the country’s success comes from educational policies and practices that have helped to develop social cohesion, economic development, and nation building. As Deng and Gopinathan suggest, reforms that aim to borrow “best practices” must consider the social, cultural and institutional contexts of which they are a part.

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