Cues for Change, September 2020

The idea that underpins the Cues for change is that as policy-makers and those in leadership roles, within the public sector and local government in particular, you must be able and willing to explore the forces that drive change, to anticipate change and to develop an understanding of the possible impact that these changes may have. If leaders are more aware of the bigger picture, the prize is being better able to plan for uncertainty and become more adaptable in meeting change as it happens. The pace of change facing local government is unrelenting. Budget constraints, increasing demand, assessing more complex needs, technological advances, party politics and constitutional reform all create a turbulence and challenge for the public sector. The reality is that to be on the front foot, local government has to respond quickly to an everchanging landscape: this requires intellectual, strategic and cultural agility. We hope that in some small way, a regular read of our Cues for Change may assist in this.

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